Super Super Tuesday

Super Super Tuesday

Or “The Washington Walrus’ Guide & Insight to Super Tuesday”.

What makes Super Tuesday so super? And why have we, The Washington Walrus, elected to add another “super” into the mix? Yes, this was no fortuitous matter. For you see, while the media and pundits have been endlessly speculating on the ramifications of the debates and results from recent primaries/caucuses, the fact of the matter is that everything could go topsy turvy this Tuesday coming. Here’s a few questions we’ve submitted and answered ourselves to shed some light.

What is Super Tuesday?

It’s like the Wrestlemania of the primary season for Republicans and Democrats. Since there’s nothing going on with the former party, the latter will be granted the full glare of the spotlight when 14 states (and the American Samoa caucuses) go up for grabs.

What are these states?

There’s Alabama, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Maine, Massachusetts, Minnesota, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, and Virginia.

How many delegates are up for grabs?

A thousand, three hundred and thirty four! To put this in context, 100 have been granted so far (with 54 more shortly as South Carolina is decided) out of a total 3,979. So while it’s not a complete deal breaker, it’s a very strong indicator of where the stars align.

What state has the most?

California with 415.

So should the candidates not put more effort into the likes of California than say, Maine?

Now, now. Maine’s 24 delegates may seem meager in comparison but the little things matter and come the general election, you’ll want to make sure you’ve covered more than just the east and west coast. Hillary learned this the hard way. After all, the electoral college is still a thing.

What is the electoral college?

Ughh… we’ll get to that at another time.

So why is so much emphasis placed on Iowa?

As aforementioned, the media revel in a good post-results analysis and while this may not account for what happens Super Tuesday, it’s important to see who has momentum. Iowa, as the first state, is something of a springboard. When Pete Buttigieg prematurely announced his victory (quite unfairly and somewhat inaccurately), he got the spotlight to shine just a little brighter on him. Sleepy Joe, on the otherhand, with his lack of success, quickly got painted as a candidate in decline.

Who’s leading right now?

Without South Carolina’s results accounted for, Bernie Sanders is leading at the moment with 45 delegates; Mayor Pete’s in 2nd place with 25; Sleepy Joe with 15, Elizabeth Warren with 8, and Amy Klobuchar with 7.

Who’s going to win Super Tuesday?

With a diverse range of states, nobody exactly wins, although a victor will be painted as such. It’s a little hard to call. Bernie Sanders has recently been topping polls nationwide so my money would be on him. This could be a turning point for the trailing Joe Biden however, who’s asserted he has a better chance of winning over Trump supporters and more moderate democrats. Mayor Pete too, is angling this territory whilst Elizabeth Warren’s settled into the gap between Bernie and them. In the end though, it’ll probably be a mix with Pete and Biden (and possibly Warren) hanging on through to the end of March.

What about Bloomberg?

His debate performances thus far have been so terrible that his camp could even do with getting help from Jeb! 2016 (don’t forget the exclamation mark). He has a tonne of money though, so you can’t exactly rule him out.

When exactly will we know who the Democratic nominee is?

The primary season ends in early June, although we should have a good idea by the end of April. Then, of course, there’s the shadowy league of super-delegates to deal with.

What are super-delegates?

Nobody quite knows. It is said they were born from an occult-like, yet beige, experiment in the woods when leading Democratic establishment figures realized they could lose the run of things after several disappointing election results. Actually, we wrote an article back in 2016 about them if you’re interested but what you need to know is that at 775 members (this year), they make up 1/5 of the total delegates and vote after the primary season is over. They’re criticized largely because they can potentially muck up things and could undermine the nomination of, oh let’s say, Bernie Sanders, should he prove problematic to the party’s core members.

When is Super Tuesday?

This Tuesday. We already mentioned this.

Ah.

Indeed. Any other questions?

Yes, why is this site called the Washington Walrus? 

Washington- cause we deal primarily with American politics. Walrus- to suggest a degree of majesty.

I don’t know if they’re all that majestic-

We said a degree of- that concludes this article!

 

 

 

Can Bernie Do It?

Can Bernie Do It?

We are a week out from the Iowa caucus now and my hopeful 2015 self should be starting to re-emerge in full blossom. Bernie Sanders is leading. Not only there. But in New Hampshire. Momentum is growing. The attacks are escalating on him, yes, but they don’t seem to be having the desired effect. And yet, I’m filled with trepidation when anyone speaks the warm and effervescent words “President Sanders”. I should stop them. I raise a finger as if to offer counsel but I just cant. Hardship must be learned in the battle fields.

I speak metaphorically, of course, with a dash of drama thrown in. After all, the 2016 election wasn’t that long ago. I still remember it well. I remember thinking: Holy cheese and crackers, he could really do it. If social media’s anything to go by, nobody’s voting for Hillary. Like that Kevin Spacey character from House of Cards, she can remain a part of the old Washington tapestry. Kevin Spacey sure does seem like a nice guy in interviews though…

What a fool I was. Not only did it turn out that my liberally-infested social media actually accounted for f- all in the grand scheme of things but apparently Kevin Spacey was also somewhat demanding on film sets. Ah, to have that cocky gleam brought back to my eyes; that penchant for hope that made 2008 a magical year for so many. But alas, it is not 2008. It’s not 2016. It’s 2020. We’ve seen the election of Donald Trump. We’ve seen Brexit come to pass. We’ve seen Bolsanaro turn a blind eye to the Amazon fires in Brazil. We’ve seen similar fires ravage the landscape of Australia and be ignored by political leadership. We’ve seen both Game of Thrones and Star Wars butchered to death. We should probably just give up and hope Sleepy Joe doesn’t make a faux pas in the debate against Donald Trump.

It would be easier that way but even though I’m skeptical of what I read on social media these days, I am hopeful to a reasonable degree. Why? Because somethings have changed for the better since 2016. Hillary may have got the nomination back then but the momentum of the party came from the rallies of Bernie Sanders. Three years later, we were given a wide and much more liberal-leaning Democratic field than we could have imagined, debating the best ways to tackle the climate change crisis without a major candidate’s proposal falling below the Greenpeace B grade. The year before, the Democrats also took the House back with cultural change highlighted in the election of representatives like Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Ilhan Omar.

Despite becoming a household name, Sanders has had, in some respects, a tougher climb this time around however. Whilst a breath of fresh air in 2015/16, by the time candidates were declaring early last year, he was one of several leftist options. Warren was leading him for the most part. Even, Kamala Harris managed a strong ascent for awhile. Joe Biden, of course, became the presumptive nominee even before he had announced. Plus, the rise of woke culture meant he had to deal with the impossible contention of being “another old white man”; a deal breaker for some people we can’t find a politically correct word for. He also had to account for some volunteers of his sexually harrassing others in 2016, as if he personally shepharded every single person involved in his campaign. The criticism was feeble and his moral consistency never wavered; that’s why he managed to succeed.

In recent weeks, the attacks have gotten more desperate. First, Elizabeth Warren affirmed that in a private meeting in December 2018, Sanders had told her he didn’t believe a woman could be president. She quickly tried to downplay the importance of this, which seemed unfair considering anyone alive would know how big a splash this would make. Sanders outright dismissed the validity of this statement anyways, leaving speculation to hang in the air although to many, Warren’s allegations came across as calculated given her falling poll numbers. Then Hillary Clinton, most calculated of all politicians, said that “nobody likes” Sanders, criticizing the culture around “Bernie Bros” and calling him a “career politician”. This may have boosted his numbers, if anything because a) people saw this as a child-like insult, b) people countered that he had done in excess of 30 rallies for her in 2016 (far more than she did for Obama in 2008), and c) not that many people like her (even Trump probably thought to enter the backlash for a minute before returning to his Mc Cheese Burger). And then, Bernie had the audacity to share a video of popular podcaster Joe Rogan saying he’d “probably” vote for Sanders, which many pointed out, was wrong because Joe Rogan has said made some controversial comments about trans people in the past. Bernie’s team responded by saying that just because he valued the endorsement does not mean he agrees with everything Joe Rogan says. I mean, it was hardly an endorsement from the KKK.

So, the attacks don’t seem to be landing. The latest polls show Bernie leading Buttigieg and Biden in Iowa. There is a good chance he could win the primaries and go onto becoming the Democratic nominee. His battle with Trump will be a whole other challenge thereafter. I don’t believe there are any proper controversies that are worth taking this man down. Unfortunately, I’m not part of the crowd with the loudest voices. Taking into account those cases above, anything seems to be on the cards for a stir. Bernie could lose half of his online California following by dismissing a vegan sandwich as “gross”. Maybe he’ll stand on a grasshopper? Who knows? For now, most people seem to be wising up to the vapid nature of woke criticism but just remember any previous election in US history; things get dirty and viscous. Is it worth discarding an A candidate if we discover a little tip-ex over the minus part that follows? Is it worth jeopardizing the future of the party over impossible standards and loose lips that okay, sometimes say the wrong words (or the right words the wrong way)?

The idea of “President Sanders” is not an impossibility. It is not going to be a walk in the park either. Just as the Republicans have united to win elections when unity was called for, so should the Democrats follow suit. And I mean this too for if Warren or Biden or Buttigieg (somehow) gets the nomination. The hope that defined Obama’s rise twelve years ago was a noble but surface concept; the jaded US of today needs something a little more tangible.

The Battle of the Democrats Begins

The Battle of the Democrats Begins

17 months yet remain till the deciding vote is cast for the next president of the United States, if indeed, there is one (and if there is indeed still a democracy). Just about every key Democrat figure you’ve heard of has their thrown their name into the ring with over 20 candidates now declared. With this wild assembly threatening the already weakened image of the excuse-me-sir-is-this-gluten-free party, a plan is now more important than ever. This is why there will be two Democratic debates held this week… yes, two… and with 10 candidates apiece. Will they resolve some differences and set a standard goal with which to hammer the incumbent? Or will they sully the already murky waters of their objectives and philosophies? Let’s investigate.

Debate #1 (Wednesday, 26 June)

Candidates: Elizabeth Warren; Beto O’ Rourke; Cory Booker; Amy Klobuchar; John Delaney; Tulsi Gabbard; Julian Castro; Tim Ryan; Bill de Blasio; Jay Inslee

Essentially the B-side to the following night’s debate, this is Warren’s chance to shine among a field of relative obscurities (on the national stage). She is seen as a far-left choice by some and too economically-minded by others but her rising stardom coupled with her no-nonsense resolve makes her an inviting alternative to Sanders, whilst also carrying the torch of those determined to see their first female president. In my opinion, she could make for an excellent president (polling behind Biden and Sanders) but her anti-Wall Street sentiments and lack of (let’s say) wackiness gives her a challenge of image for the undecided. Unfortunately, I could see Trump painting her as a weak-minded loopy socialist of some sort.

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As for the others, I don’t want to exactly disparage or dismiss them but when your strongest challenger shoots for Dukakis-like photo ops (see below) and just lost a Senatorial race to slimy Ted Cruz, it’s difficult to see them going far. Still, Beto O’Rourke is an affable candidate, in many people’s minds, and his youthful image could provide a much desired contrast to the dinosaurs dominating American politics today.

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Like Hugh Grant after an emotional confession in the rain

Debate #2 (Thursday, 27 June)

Candidates: Marianna Williamson; John Hickenlooper; Andrew Yang; Pete Buttigieg; Joe Biden; Bernie Sanders; Kamala Harris; Kirsten Gillibrand; Michael Bennett; Eric Swalwell

The media’s attention will undoubtedly be placed on drawing distinctions between Biden and Sanders; the two front-runners wrestling for the soul of the party. Will the more centrist slick politics of the former VP fare well or will the should-have-been nominated choice of the left topple him? For many, it’s essentially Clinton-vs.-Sanders part two. Biden, however, is no Clinton. Yes, he is not as liberal as Sanders or Warren but he’s also not as rehearsed and guarded as the former Secretary of State. Biden’s appeal lies in his compassion and relatability; something someone who’s been as involved as he has (and for as long as he has) should not have. People like him. He could probably hold his own against Trump the way others might not. His main problem, in these debates and the primaries, will be in overcoming controversies relating to past decisions (certain votes, Anita Hill) and behavior (the whole massaging people’s shoulders thing) but these are essentially overblown by the woke no-context trolls of the internet. Let’s remember, before we injure another promising candidate, that people’s attitudes were different in the ’80s and ’90s and that whatever any of these people have said simply does not compare to what the current president is actually doing.

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Enough about Joe though. Let’s move onto Sanders. He was my own preferred candidate back in 2016 and a part of me would love to see him become the next president but honestly (and sorry), some of the magic has worn off. It may be the fact that the democratic base has become more liberal (thanks in large part to himself), making him just another voice among the throngs; it may be that some of his ideas (free tuition) just don’t seem practically attainable; it may even be that I’ve just heard his message too often- but the level of excitement surrounding his run just isn’t what it felt like four years ago. Perhaps, I’ve become jaded. I don’t know. The important thing to remember is, and you can find this in the polls, that he stands a very good shot. Some liberals need to be reminded that although yes, he is another white old man, he has been the most committed champion of their causes (something his team keeps prodding about on social media). His fans, then, also need to be reminded that it does no good to act like a whiny little bitch and refuse to support whoever beats him. Let’s also not make age an issue. Biden’s one year younger than him and Trump is 73.

Bernie Sanders Delivers Policy Address On Democratic Socialism In Washington DC

Besides those two, some of these candidates are intriguing, if not yet convincing. Pete Buttigieg, for instance, is a 37-year old gay/veteran/liberal mayor, who’s drawn a lot of attention for his eloquence. He sounds smart and he can’t be pinned down to one specific picture; almost the perfect contrast to Trump. The problem is nobody really knows what he’s all about. Remember kids, identity politics isn’t everything. Then there’s Kamala Harris, one of the earliest candidates to declare. A former prosecutor, she’s a tough one, who for all her law experiences, gains all the more credibility in her attacks against Trump. Andrew Yang has meanwhile discerned himself from the rest, putting ideology aside, to focus on universal basic income and the decreasing number of jobs available in America. This seems common sense but pundits and commentators sometimes forget how crucial economic matters are to voters’ minds. This is worrying, of course, because the economy is actually doing well, thanks to Obama, but credited by Trump to Trump. Democrats can’t let the president seize this victory.

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And lastly…

It’s early days yet. Although I’ve only focused on a few candidates, everyone has a chance to shine up on stage. Nothing’s guaranteed. Someone could, for instance, fart and break down right there and then. Someone could do a George Bush and run two words into the one. Someone could do an Al Gore and look smarmy for just a moment too long. Anything’s possible.

In some ways, it’s ridiculous that these debates are happening as early as they are and in some ways, it’s a good thing. The Democratic party has not tended to unify as solidly as the Republicans have in the past. After all, look how quickly everyone abandoned their principles and got behind Trump in 2016? Despicable but remarkable. The democrats need to stop shooting their own. If Biden’s a little too centrist for you, so what? He’s a lot better for your country than Trump is. Is Warren not exciting enough? It doesn’t matter. She’ll get the job done well. Democrats failed to resolve the conflict between their own ideals and the bigger picture back in 2016 again. If they fail this time, then America will truly be granted the president it deserves.